Knowing yourself is the beginning of all wisdom. To know yourself is to master self awareness. Self-awareness is positively correlated with higher levels of overall happiness.

The first step for practicing self-awareness is gaining a greater awareness of your emotions. The second step is making a habit of tracking your feelings. Begin to track your most positive feelings and your most negative feelings. This is where Fettle can assist.

Fettle: state or condition of health, fitness, wholeness, spirit, or form – often used in the phrase, “In Fine Fettle”. What is your fettle state?

Every Evening Score Your Day. Rate it between -2, -1, 0, +1 & +2. Write a brief paragraph of the days highlights. Write down your most positive feelings and your most negative feelings.

learn to see what makes your life a low 🙁 of -2 OR a HIGH 🙂 of +2. Overtime you will build a picture and drill down to see what in your life
sparks a +2 🙂 and what provokes a -2 🙁

You will begin to notice patterns and trends. Begin to see what makes you truly happy!

Download from the App Store

To learn more the app is also available as a web app at fettle.life

I was fortunate enough to have started Tai Chi a moving meditation at a very early age. Practicing Tai Chi for over 25 years has allowed me to build a solid foundation to support the most important aspect of EQ development, which is attention training.

If you are interested in supporting yourself or helping the teams you manage, the links below can help you learn more about EQ training.

  1. What is EQ?
  2. Emotional Intelligence Training Course
  3. Learn to meditate with the Just6 App
  4. Improve Self Awareness with the Fettle-App
  5. Meditation and the Science
  6. 7 reasons that emotional intelligence is quickly becoming one of the top sought job skills
  7. The secret to a high salary Emotional intelligence
  8. How to bring mindfulness into your employee wellness program
  9. Google ’Search Inside Yourself’

surfing improves your emotional intelligence. It’s not surprising why psychologists and coaching experts find emotional intelligence to be one of the key predictors of success. See how surfing helps your EQ. See other methods.

Emotional Intelligence, describes an ability or capacity to perceive, assess, and manage the emotions of one’s self, and of others.

It’s not surprising why psychologists and career coaching experts find emotional intelligence to be one of the key predictors of success. That’s because people with high EQ can work well under pressure and because they are able to understand other people’s emotions, it is easier for them to get along with others.

Emotionally intelligent people are also effective communicators as they are able to manage their emotions while responding to others. Their ability to listen well makes them more sensitive to the needs of others. Their open-mindedness and capacity for empathy help them adapt to change in both business or social settings.

Emotionally intelligent people make great leaders because they are able to make sound decisions based on facts and careful evaluation that also take into consideration the views of others. They are able to connect with others emotionally, which helps build trust in any relationship.

Jobs such as those in sales and customer service in which emotional competencies obviously make a big difference, we already intuitively know. What surprised me was from the work done at Google with their ‘Search Inside Yourself’ course. They reported that this is true even for individual contributors in the tech sector, namely engineers whom you would expect to succeed purely on intellectual prowess. The top six competencies that distinguish star performers from average performers in the tech sector are:

  1. Strong achievement drive and high achievement standards [EQ]
  2. Ability to influence [EQ]
  3. Conceptual thinking [IQ]
  4. Analytical ability [IQ]
  5. Initiative in taking on challenges [EQ]
  6. Self-confidence [EQ]

Of the top six, only two (conceptual thinking and analytical ability) are purely intellectual competencies. The other four, including the top two, are emotional competencies.

Decades of research now points to emotional intelligence as the critical factor that sets star performers apart from the rest of the pack. It’s a powerful way to focus your energy in one direction with a tremendous results. TalentSmart tested emotional intelligence alongside 33 other important workplace skills, and found that emotional intelligence is the strongest predictor of performance, explaining a full 58 percent of success in all types of jobs.

Emotional Intelligence Can Be Developed.

Some people have naturally good EQ skills. Others need to work on them. The good news is that everyone can get better. Unlike IQ, people can actually improve their emotional intelligence. Emotional intelligence is trainable, even in adults. This claim is based on a new branch of science known as “neuroplasticity.”

Why surfing helps build EQ

Activity in the presence of nature improves both mental and physical health, reducing stress, improving attention capacity, mood, and general well being.

Surfing produces a powerful rush of neurochemicals associated with happiness and well-being, including oxytocin, endorphins, and dopamine. This rush of chemicals aids in the reduction of stress and the enhancement of attention capacity and mood.

There are five categories of emotional intelligence. They are;

  1. Self-awareness. Identify your emotions and analyse your reactions.
  2. Self-regulation. Practice control over your emotions and recognise impulses.
  3. Motivation. An emotionally intelligent person is capable of motivating himself.
  4. Empathy. Empathy is more than just putting yourself in the shoes of others.
  5. Social skills. Hear the words and the emotions behind what was communicated to you, then respond with honesty and sensitivity.

So how do we train emotional intelligence? It turns out the first step is attention training. The idea is to train attention to create a quality of mind that is calm and clear at the same time. That quality of mind forms the foundation for emotional intelligence. The foundation of surfing is also the foundation of EQ training, “A Strong Attention Capacity”.

The way to train your attention is with “mindfulness meditation.” Mindfulness is defined by Jon Kabat-Zinn as “paying attention in a particular way: on purpose, in the present moment, and non-judgmentally.”

Mindfulness is a quality of mind that we all experience and enjoy from time to time. And many a surfer feels this often! It’s something that can be made stronger with practice. Once it becomes strong, it leads to calmness and clarity that forms the basis of emotional intelligence.

Surfing combined with mindfulness can increase the effectiveness of both practices. Surfing itself is a form of everyday mindfulness. It demands attention to the present moment. Missing the perfect wave or getting pounded by an incoming set is strong incentive to maintain focus.

Surfers must focus all of their attention on balancing on their boards and getting ready for the next wave. Because this requires so much attention, surfers don’t have time to worry about anything else. Anyone who has a lot on their mind can benefit greatly from paddling out into the water and riding a few waves.

Once you have a solid attention foundation then you can move to self-awareness. Surfers become more self-aware by riding the waves. This activity forces them to connect with their bodies, identify their limitations, and acknowledge their strengths. Becoming more self-aware can build confidence and help individuals increase their emotional intelligence.

For many, surfing goes beyond sport and often leads to a more fulfilling, uplifting, and meaningful life. Surfing is an ideal practice for supporting long-term mental and physical health.

Surfing isn’t easy. A surfer can spend a lifetime improving their skills and seeking ever more challenging waves. It is the same journey if you’re trying to improve your EQ. As you evolve as a surfer and as a human, strong self-awareness will keep you on the right wave so you can enjoy the ride 🙂

My years of managing dev teams lead me to develop an EQ training course. It was easy for me to develop their technical abilities but what I found, what would truly boost their careers was improving EQ skills.

I was fortunate enough to have started Tai Chi a moving meditation at a very early age. Practising Tai Chi for over 25 years has allowed me to build a solid foundation to support the most important aspect of EQ development, which is attention training. My surfing and windsurfing have also been integral in my understanding of EQ.

If you are interested in supporting yourself or helping the teams you manage, the links below can help you learn more about EQ training.

Enjoy the waves 🙂



  1. What is EQ?
  2. Emotional Intelligence Training Course
  3. Learn to meditate with the Just6 App
  4. Meditation and the Science
  5. 7 reasons that emotional intelligence is quickly becoming one of the top sought job skills
  6. The secret to a high salary Emotional intelligence
  7. How to bring mindfulness into your employee wellness program
  8. Google ’Search Inside Yourself’

Featured image from unspalsh – by Tim Marshall

Neuroscience shows that uncertainty and increased stress can shut down the logical part of our minds. This brings immense challenges to work and leadership. Tap into the emotion of teams for more effective business results.

The reasons I built the Just Being course at Jumo was for this exact reason. Tap into the Emotion of Teams for more effective business results can only be done with an effective emotional intelligence training course.  I saw this article posted here and thought I would share.

Employee Engagement is the number one HR Leadership priority for 2017 (_Deloitte’s_ 2016 _Human Capital_ Trends report) and with Brexit on the horizon and the policies promised by President Trump, we are entering a period of uncertainty for many business leaders.

Neuroscience has proven that uncertainty and increased stress can shut down the logical part of our minds as we focus on survival.   This brings immense challenges to the world of work and leadership.

Research from Gallup shows that employees in the 20- 36 year age group are the least engaged generation in the workplace to date, with many changing jobs and workers actively looking for new roles. This signals a bumpy ride for management teams in retaining good people.

The study highlights how millennials are pushing organsiations to reinvent how they lead and manage, highlighting what 21st century workers seek from employment today. The underlying principles for driving engagement among these millennials lie in the climate that a leader has created in the organisation. Indeed this may be true for all workers. As the title of the famous Harvard Business Review article stated, “Why should anyone be led by you!”

Research has shown that leadership climate is a known predicter of employee engagement and empowerment, directly relating to an organisation’s financial performance. Employees are over four times more likely to be engaged working in an emotionally intelligent leadership climate.

How does it feel to work around here – am I encouraged and inspired to stretch myself to my full potential?

The climate of any organisation is greatly influenced by the Emotional Intelligence of its leaders.  Emotional Intelligence and the ability to lead people through a volatile and complex working world are seen as the greatest competitive advance for the 21st century.

A six year longitudinal study of 167 high-tech start-ups in Silicon Valley with different management and leadership styles highlighted that those who had the least chance of business failure and who achieved sustainable growth and investment funding adopted a commitment model of leadership.  These organisations put a focus on their employees, created a common purpose, provided meaningful work and developed collaboration.

Key Questions leaders should ask themselves

  • What is my mindset?  Am I creating a mindful/thriving climate that builds long term success
  • How am I feeling? How self-aware am I of my feelings and those around me?
  • How do I choose to behave – do I take time out to reflect on situations and prepare for key conversations and meetings – what is my objective , what fingerprint do I want to leave.
Tap into the Emotion of Teams for more effective business results

Measuring Climate** The Leadership Climate indicator model (JCAglobal) measures 12 key leadership behaviours that demonstrate the prevalence of 4 leadership styles – Inspiring, Including, Controlling and Withdrawing leadership. It explores how the tone set by the organisations leaders is felt throughout the company and measures the impact this is having on perfomance, well-being and innovation.

What can today’s leaders learn from these studies?

At the recent Talent Summit event many common themes were coming through from the significant line up of Senior HR, L&D and Business leaders including keynote speaker Daniel Pink

  • Build Self-awareness – Leaders who are aware of their own behaviours and those of their team are closer to the reality of what is really going on in the business. Be aware of the barriers for your team. The single biggest motivator for an employee is to make progress in meaningful work.
  • Ensure all employees are clear on the Purpose of the organisation – Why do we exist? Why does this organisation matter?
  • Provide Regular Feedback – encourage an environment where feedback is seen as development and an opportunity to reduce blindspots and stretch.
  • Build Trust – Internally with employees, team members and externally with customers and suppliers. Actively build and develop relationships.
  • Create an atmosphere of openness – Make it safe to challenge and offer alternative ideas.
  • Stretch and Empower individuals – don’t micromanage – Encourage responsibility – give them autonomy.
  • Value and appreciate others – Celebrate successes and recognise a job well done.

I was fortunate enough to have started Tai Chi a moving meditation at a very early age. Practising Tai Chi for over 25 years has allowed me to build a solid foundation to support the most important aspect of EQ development, which is attention training.

If you are interested in supporting yourself or helping the teams you manage, the links below can help you learn more about EQ training.

  1. What is EQ?
  2. Emotional Intelligence Training Course
  3. Learn to meditate with the Just6 App
  4. Meditation and the Science
  5. 7 reasons that emotional intelligence is quickly becoming one of the top sought job skills
  6. The secret to a high salary Emotional intelligence
  7. How to bring mindfulness into your employee wellness program
  8. Google ’Search Inside Yourself’

Mindfulness may increase mental performance at work. Mindfulness influences changes to awareness and behaviour that, in turn, play key roles in producing favorable workplace outcomes. Boosts performance!

Here is another great article I found from Key Step Media by Matthew Lippincott

Mindfulness may increase mental performance at Work? During my study of the relationship between mindfulness and leader effectiveness, 100% of the leaders I interviewed (all having months or years of prior mindfulness training and practice) linked mindfulness to improvement in their personal and professional lives. The majority described this as being significant, often using terms such as “profound,” or “life-changing.” My previous articles on EI draw from this research, exploring the way mindfulness influences each of the 12 Emotional Intelligence competencies, based on interviews with organizational leaders from around the world.

My findings ultimately reveal the following:

Mindfulness influences changes to awareness and behavior that, in turn, play key roles in producing favorable workplace outcomes.

Improved Mental Performance and More Effective Behavior

One of these changes, improved mental performance, was described by participants as having a positive, overarching effect on functions such as decision-making, susceptibility to distractions, and attention. This is not surprising since mindfulness is sometimes defined as meta-awareness, including our ability to non-judgmentally observe where our attention is and is not focused.

This capability can become a “real-time” skill set, taking the form of simultaneous observation of our interaction with others, and our internal reactions to that activity. The leaders I interviewed described this level of awareness, reporting that it provided them with a degree of “mental clarity.” Below are the specific benefits described, and the percentage of participants who reported experiencing them:

  • Ability to identify signs of potential conflict (in time to take corrective action) – 90
  • Capacity to more effectively navigate organizational relationships – 88
  • Improved ability to recognize emotional reactions in themselves and others – 86
  • Increased attentiveness and patience with others – 74
  • More productive responses to the emotional states of others – 100
  • Recognition of the negative influence of stress and anxiety – 88
  • Openness to new ideas and input from others – 90
how mindfulness boosts emotional intelligence graphic

Descriptions of these benefits were provided in the context of how mindfulness helped leaders gain new information about themselves, others, and their workplace culture. This information was then incorporated into their efforts to improve the effectiveness of their interactions with others. As the graphic below illustrates, leaders described an upward spiral of improvement. New insight about self and others fed back into additional, positive changes to beliefs and awareness, which paved the way for more effective behavior.

Real World Examples of Applying Mindfulness at Work

Many of the leaders reported that improved mental performance made them better able to identify and filter out distractions such as emotional reactivity and bias. A senior manager with one of the largest research and publishing firms in the world described this experience in the following way: ” you’re able to calm yourself down and put yourself in a better position to listen to someone… it helps me to be calm and think clearly and to focus…I find I’m able to be composed and organized and clear in my communications.”

Leaders specifically mentioned that mindfulness training helped them be more present when interacting with others. This included a greater ability to monitor what their attention was focused on or being distracted by. They also mentioned becoming better at observing whether or not they were listening carefully, asking relevant questions, and picking up on interpersonal cues and organizational context.

This type of observation, and the value it provides, was well articulated by an executive specializing in global communication and strategy: “(mindfulness) enables you to read other people better and be more sensitive to what’s driving their commentary, their presentation, their behavior…their body language. That makes the connection between the two of you much more on an equal footing basis. So you’re no longer either selling to a position of power, or talking to a position of power. You are in fact exchanging information and dealing with each other on footing that is, at least emotionally, much more equal.”

A new appreciation for the importance of empathy in the workplace was also identified by leaders as a benefit arising from improved mental performance. This resulted from developing a stronger ability to identify and manage the role their own emotional reactions played in their perceptions of others.

A leader who has held executives roles at one of the largest organizations in the world elaborated on this point in the following statement: “It definitely increases your empathy by helping you put yourself in the other person’s shoes. You slow down your responses, and when you sort of look at why that person is reacting in that manner it helps you be more compassionate because the moment you have empathy you start thinking from a very human perspective about the situation and trying to understand what the problem is. And the moment I take that approach I realize that I have solved the problem more effectively.”

What You Can Do to Cultivate Better Mental Performance

Look for opportunities to practice in the workplace, since this will help you develop exactly the type of capabilities needed for improved performance. The following suggestions come from details shared by leaders on this topic during interviews:

  • When interacting with others in-person or remotely, put your phone away, turn off your email, web browser, or even your monitor
  • Try and continuously monitor where your eyes are focused during interactions with others, as well as your facial expression and what it may be conveying
  • Take notes on what you are observing during interactions with others, specifically what they may be expressing through tone, body language, and choice of words
  • Regularly ask questions aimed at surfacing misinterpretations
  • Take time each day to identify emotional reactions that may have a negative influence on your mental performance

Improved mental performance can be developed through regular practice, not unlike athletic training. There are a variety of software tools and meditation practices available that help strengthen intensity and duration of attention, however, they may not improve your ability to actively observe and more fully understand your thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. For this type of development, consider formal mindfulness training, but be sure that the instructor is thoroughly qualified, and plan to make a consistent time commitment if you want results.


I was fortunate enough to have started Tai Chi a moving meditation at a very early age. Practising Tai Chi for over 25 years has allowed me to build a solid foundation to support the most important aspect of EQ development, which is attention training.

If you are interested in supporting yourself or helping the teams you manage, the links below can help you learn more about EQ training.

  1. What is EQ?
  2. Emotional Intelligence Training Course
  3. Learn to meditate with the Just6 App
  4. Meditation and the Science
  5. 7 reasons that emotional intelligence is quickly becoming one of the top sought job skills
  6. The secret to a high salary Emotional intelligence
  7. How to bring mindfulness into your employee wellness program
  8. Google ’Search Inside Yourself’

By answering these questions and starting to change your routine reactions, you’ll be well on your way boost your emotional intelligence. And figure out the old habits that aren’t serving you.

Found this amazing post by Daniel Goleman and Michele Nevarez here.

As the concept of emotional intelligence has gone global, we’ve watched professionals founder as they try to improve their emotional intelligence (or EI) because they either don’t know where to focus their efforts or they haven’t understood how to improve these skills on a practical level.

In our work consulting with companies and coaching leaders, we have found that if you’re looking to develop particular EI strengths, it helps to consider areas for improvement _others_ have identified along with the goals _you_ want to achieve — and then to actively build habits in those areas rather than simply relying on understanding them conceptually.

To that end, start by asking yourself three questions:

What are the differences between how you see yourself and how others see you?

The first step, as with all learning, is to get a sense of how your self-perception (how you see yourself) differs from your reputation (how others see you).

This is especially true for the development of emotional intelligence because we can be blind to, not to mention biased about, how we express and read the emotional components of our interactions. For example, most of us think that we’re good listeners, but very often that’s really not the case. Without this external reality check, it will be difficult for you to identify the ways that your actions affect your performance. Getting feedback from others can also provide proof of the necessity of shifting our behaviors and an impetus to do so.

Furthermore, emotional intelligence can’t be boiled down to a single score, as is done with IQ. You can’t just say that you’re “good” or “bad” at emotional intelligence. There are four separate aspects of it, and we’re all better at some than others: self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, and relationship management. (Within these domains nests a total of 12 learned and learnable competencies).

To give you the best sense of where the differences lie between your self-perception and your reputation, then, you should use a 360-degree feedback assessment that takes into account the multiple facets of EI. We use the Emotional and Social Competency Index, or ESCI-360 (a commercially available product one of us —Dan — developed with Richard Boyatzis of Case Western Reserve University and Korn Ferry’s Hay Group), but many organizations have their own assessments. The key is to find one that guarantees confidentiality to those giving you feedback, that is focused on development and not on performance assessment (which skews the feedback), and that can give you a detailed sense of where others gauge you differently than you gauge yourself.

Another way to get an outside perspective on how your actions impact your relationships and your work is to work with a coach. A coach can help you delve under the surface and look at how your assumptions and personal narratives may be working against you. To find a well-trained coach, do your due diligence; coaching is not a licensed profession, so it is up to you to get references and to find out if a prospective coach has gone through a rigorous training program. If working with a coach is not feasible, find a learning partner instead, ideally a colleague whose opinions you trust and who would be willing to talk over how you are doing on a regular basis.

What matters to you?

When you get your feedback from an assessment or your coach, let that inform what you want to improve. But also consider what _your_ goals are — how you want to get better at what you do now, or where you want to go in the future. When it comes to cultivating strengths in emotional intelligence, you’re at a huge disadvantage if you’re only interested because a colleague, your boss, or someone in HR said you should be. Your emotional intelligence is so tied up in your sense of self that being intrinsically motivated to make the effort matters more when changing longstanding habits than it does when simply learning a skill like budgeting.

That means the areas that you choose to actively work on should lie at the intersection of the feedback you’ve gotten and the areas that are most important to your own aspirations. Ask yourself: Do you want to grow your capacity to take on a leadership position? Be a better team member? Exert greater positive influence? Get better at managing yourself, or keeping the goals that matter in focus? Or — your goals need not be only professional — do you want to have a better connection to your spouse or teenager? Understanding the impacts of your current EI habits relative to your goals will keep you going over the long haul as you do the work of strengthening your emotional intelligence.

For example, let’s say you get feedback that you are not a great listener — but you think you are. Instead of taking this assessment as an attack, or simply dismissing it, step back and consider your goals: Perhaps you’ve said that you want to better connect, understand, and communicate with impact. How could listening well help you to do those things? Seeing the feedback in this light can help you position it as an opportunity for developing toward your goals, rather than a threat.

What changes will you make to achieve these goals?

Once you’ve determined which EI skills you want to focus on, identify specific actions that you’ll take. If you’re working on becoming a better listener, for example, you might decide that when you’re conversing with someone you’ll take the time to pause, listen to what they have to say, and check that you understand before you reply. Keep it specific. That helps you change the target habit.

You should also take every naturally occurring opportunity to practice the skill you’re developing, no matter how small. You’re trying to train your brain to react differently in common situations, and the principle of neuroplasticity tells us that as a given brain circuit gets used more often, the connections within it become stronger. And the brain does not distinguish between home and work when it comes to changing your habits: Practice at home as well as at work, with your partner or teenager as you would with your boss or direct reports.

Spotting these opportunities to trot out your new habit requires a bit of extra awareness. At first this will take effort (and actually doing it might feel strange). But each time you do it, these new pathways in your brain strengthen their connection, making your new approach easier and more habitual. Soon you’ll find it more natural to pause and listen for a reply, for example, than to cut off the person you’re talking with in your excitement to respond. One day you will reach a neural landmark: The new habit will kick in automatically, without you having to make any effort. That means your new habit has replaced the old as your brain’s default circuit.

Here, too, a coach can be useful to you along the way, especially if they are explicitly trained in helping leaders and executives develop their EI strengths. From accessing the right kind of evaluation to observing you in action, a well-trained coach can work with you to identify personal narratives or habitual patterns of mind that undermine your ability to get out of your own way, and instead talk you through those days when life’s pressures force you back into your old, not-so-good habits.

By answering these questions and starting to change your routine reactions, you’ll be well on your way to figuring out the old habits that aren’t serving you well and transforming them into new, improved ones that do.


I was fortunate enough to have started Tai Chi a moving meditation at a very early age. Practicing Tai Chi for over 25 years has allowed me to build a solid foundation to support the most important aspect of EQ development, which is attention training.

If you are interested in supporting yourself or helping the teams you manage, the links below can help you learn more about EQ training.

  1. What is EQ?
  2. Emotional Intelligence Training Course
  3. Learn to meditate with the Just6 App
  4. Meditation and the Science
  5. 7 reasons that emotional intelligence is quickly becoming one of the top sought job skills
  6. The secret to a high salary Emotional intelligence
  7. How to bring mindfulness into your employee wellness program
  8. Google ’Search Inside Yourself’

Decades of research now point to lack emotional intelligence as being the critical factor that sets star performers apart from the rest of the pack. Learn the signs that you lack emotional intelligence.

This was a good read thought I should share. This is why the Just Being Emotional Intelligence Course is so valuable. You can follow the original article here.

When emotional intelligence (EQ) first appeared to the masses, it served as the missing link in a peculiar finding: people with average IQs outperform those with the highest IQs 70 percent of the time. This anomaly threw a massive wrench into the broadly held assumption that IQ was the sole source of success.

Decades of research now point to emotional intelligence as being the critical factor that sets star performers apart from the rest of the pack. The connection is so strong that 90 percent of top performers have high emotional intelligence.

Emotional intelligence is the “something” in each of us that is a bit intangible. It affects how we manage behavior, navigate social complexities, and make personal decisions to achieve positive results.

Despite the significance of EQ, its intangible nature makes it very difficult to know how much you have and what you can do to improve if you’re lacking. You can always take a scientifically validated test, such as the one that comes with the Emotional Intelligence 2.0 book.

Unfortunately, quality (scientifically valid) EQ tests aren’t free. So, I’ve analyzed the data from the million-plus people TalentSmart has tested in order to identify the behaviors that are the hallmarks of a low EQ. These are the behaviors that you want to eliminate from your repertoire.

1. You get stressed easily. When you stuff your feelings, they quickly build into the uncomfortable sensations of tension, stress and anxiety. Unaddressed emotions strain the mind and body. Your emotional intelligence skills help make stress more manageable by enabling you to spot and tackle tough situations before things escalate. People who fail to use their emotional intelligence skills are more likely to turn to other, less effective means of managing their mood. They are twice as likely to experience anxiety, depression, substance abuse and even thoughts of suicide.

2. You have difficulty asserting yourself. People with high EQs balance good manners, empathy and kindness with the ability to assert themselves and establish boundaries. This tactful combination is ideal for handling conflict. When most people are crossed, they default to passive or aggressive behavior. Emotionally intelligent people remain balanced and assertive by steering themselves away from unfiltered emotional reactions. This enables them to neutralize difficult and toxic people without creating enemies.

3. You have a limited emotional vocabulary. All people experience emotions, but it is a select few who can accurately identify them as they occur. Our research shows that only 36 percent of people can do this, which is problematic because unlabeled emotions often go misunderstood, which leads to irrational choices and counterproductive actions. People with high EQs master their emotions because they understand them, and they use an extensive vocabulary of feelings to do so. While many people might describe themselves as simply feeling “bad,” emotionally intelligent people can pinpoint whether they feel “irritable,” “frustrated,” “downtrodden” or “anxious.” The more specific your word choice, the better insight you have into exactly how you are feeling, what caused it and what you should do about it.

4. You make assumptions quickly and defend them vehemently. People who lack EQ form an opinion quickly and then succumb to confirmation bias, meaning they gather evidence that supports their opinion and ignore any evidence to the contrary. More often than not, they argue, ad nauseam, to support it. This is especially dangerous for leaders, as their under-thought-out ideas become the entire team’s strategy. Emotionally intelligent people let their thoughts marinate, because they know that initial reactions are driven by emotions. They give their thoughts time to develop and consider the possible consequences and counter-arguments. Then, they communicate their developed idea in the most effective way possible, taking into account the needs and opinions of their audience.

5. You hold grudges. The negative emotions that come with holding on to a grudge are actually a stress response. Just thinking about the event sends your body into fight-or-flight mode, a survival mechanism that forces you to stand up and fight or run for the hills when faced with a threat. When a threat is imminent, this reaction is essential to your survival, but when a threat is ancient history, holding on to that stress wreaks havoc on your body and can have devastating health consequences over time. In fact, researchers at Emory University have shown that holding on to stress contributes to high blood pressure and heart disease. Holding on to a grudge means you’re holding on to stress, and emotionally intelligent people know to avoid this at all costs. Letting go of a grudge not only makes you feel better now but can also improve your health.

6. You don’t let go of mistakes. Emotionally intelligent people distance themselves from their mistakes, but they do so without forgetting them. By keeping their mistakes at a safe distance, yet still handy enough to refer to, they are able to adapt and adjust for future success. It takes refined self-awareness to walk this tightrope between dwelling and remembering. Dwelling too long on your mistakes makes you anxious and gun shy, while forgetting about them completely makes you bound to repeat them. The key to balance lies in your ability to transform failures into nuggets of improvement. This creates the tendency to get right back up every time you fall down.

7. You often feel misunderstood. When you lack emotional intelligence, it’s hard to understand how you come across to others. You feel misunderstood because you don’t deliver your message in a way that people can understand. Even with practice, emotionally intelligent people know that they don’t communicate every idea perfectly. They catch on when people don’t understand what they are saying, adjust their approach and re-communicate their idea in a way that can be understood.

8. You don’t know your triggers. Everyone has triggers – situations and people that push their buttons and cause them to act impulsively. Emotionally intelligent people study their triggers and use this knowledge to sidestep situations and people before they get the best of them. 9. You don’t get angry. Emotional intelligence is not about being nice; it’s about managing your emotions to achieve the best possible outcomes. Sometimes this means showing people that you’re upset, sad or frustrated. Constantly masking your emotions with happiness and positivity isn’t genuine or productive. Emotionally intelligent people employ negative and positive emotions intentionally in the appropriate situations.

10. You blame other people for how they make you feel. Emotions come from within. It’s tempting to attribute how you feel to the actions of others, but you must take responsibility for your emotions. No one can make you feel anything that you don’t want to. Thinking otherwise only holds you back.

11. You’re easily offended. If you have a firm grasp of who you are, it’s difficult for someone to say or do something that gets your goat. Emotionally intelligent people are self-confident and open-minded, which create a pretty thick skin. You may even poke fun at yourself or let other people make jokes about you because you are able to mentally draw the line between humor and degradation.

Bringing It All Together Unlike your IQ, your EQ is highly malleable. As you train your brain by repeatedly practicing new emotionally intelligent behaviors, it builds the pathways needed to make them into habits. As your brain reinforces the use of these new behaviors, the connections supporting old, destructive behaviors die off. Before long, you begin responding to your surroundings with emotional intelligence without even having to think about it.


I was fortunate enough to have started Tai Chi a moving meditation at a very early age. Practising Tai Chi for over 25 years has allowed me to build a solid foundation to support the most important aspect of EQ development, which is attention training.

If you are interested in supporting yourself or helping the teams you manage, the links below can help you learn more about EQ training.

  1. What is EQ?
  2. Emotional Intelligence Training Course
  3. Learn to meditate with the Just6 App
  4. Meditation and the Science
  5. 7 reasons that emotional intelligence is quickly becoming one of the top sought job skills
  6. The secret to a high salary Emotional intelligence
  7. How to bring mindfulness into your employee wellness program
  8. Google ’Search Inside Yourself’

Just 6 seconds of mindfulness can make you more productive, focused, creative and happy. Plus a mindfulness practice is the foundation for building EQ.

“When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be” -Lao Tzu.

While traveling abroad I became fascinated with Taoist philosophy. There exists a long history of movement and exercise systems which are associated with Taoism. I was drawn towards Tai Chi as a form of exercise which deeply connected with Taoist philosophy and notions.

After returning home I was blessed to find a teacher, Grandmaster Dr Lin Feng-Chao. His teacher was Cheng Man-Ching.

I’ve been practicing now for over 25 years. In recent years I’ve found in conversations that my perceptions, strategies and tools that support me both at work and personally, seem totally foreign to some. I’ve had an advantage with abilities to recognise emotions quickly and get less bothered by the little things. Less distracted, generally happier, less anxious and more present in the moment. When asked how? I’ve said, “Tai Chi”.

Tai Chi trains one to calm the mind on demand and return it to a natural state of happiness. Deepen self-awareness in a way that fosters self-confidence which harness empathy and compassion.

In my journey in diving deeper into the “how question”, I came across the work done at Google on their ‘Search Inside Yourself’ course. I found their research fascinating. Especially the effectiveness and importance of emotional intelligence in both work and personal life. What is mind-blowing is that emotional intelligence is trainable through the practice of mindfulness meditation. This lead me to explore the value of Tai Chi more. I’ve taken my learnings over the years and built an EQ course to support the devs I managed.

Part of that journey was exposing colleagues and students to the benefits of meditation. I wanted to build an app that gave everyone a quick tutorial on how to meditate and then follow a breathing exercise so they could follow their breath. What inspired me was an article I saw posted by Chade-Meng Tan. “Just 6 Seconds of Mindfulness Can Make You More Effective”.

What stood out for me was the following passage.

There are two reasons why taking just one mindful breath is so effective at calming the body and the mind. The physiological reason is that breaths taken mindfully tend to be slow and deep, which stimulates the vagus nerve, activating the parasympathetic nervous system. It lowers stress, reduces heart rate and blood pressure, and calms you down. The psychological reason is that when you put your attention intensely on the breath, you are fully in the present for the duration of the breath. To feel regretful, you need to be in the past; to worry, you need to be in the future. Hence, when you are fully in the present, you are temporarily free from regret and worry. That’s like releasing a heavy burden for the duration of one breath, allowing the body and mind a precious opportunity for rest and recovery.

The ability to think calmly under fire is a hallmark of great leadership. The training and deployment of this skill involves paying attention, on purpose, in the present moment, non-judgmentally. The more you bring this quality of attention to your breath, the more you strengthen the parts of your brain involved with attention and executive control, principally the prefrontal cortex.

Also an interesting article that highlights the benefits of a meditation practice, Corporations’ newest productivity hack: Meditation.

The app was developed for the students you who attended my eq course

So why all the fuss over EQ?

Businesses are experiencing the benefits of improving emotional intelligence in the workplace. Research now points to emotional intelligence as the critical factor that sets star performers apart from the rest of the pack. It’s a powerful way to focus your energy in one direction with tremendous results. Emotional intelligence has a direct link to your earning potential.

Attention is the basis of all higher cognitive and emotional abilities. Thus the key to emotional intelligence training is ATTENTION. The idea is to create a quality of mind that is clear and calm at the same time. We use mindfulness meditation to build attention so students become more emotionally intelligent.

So what makes someone emotionally intelligent?

Emotional intelligence is not a technical term in psychology. It generally refers to a person’s ability to notice and interpret emotionality in themselves and others. A person capable of looking inside, recognising and labelling their responses to situations. And then acting in a way that is both constructive and respectful of the internal process, shows a strength in emotional intelligence.

Just 6 seconds of mindfulness everyday can over time deeply and effectively enhance your attention. Attention is the foundation to improving your EQ. The Just 6 APP was developed to encourage and develop the students mindfulness practice. I will eventually write the app for iOs and Android. For now it’s a web app that is still very much in development. Your support and feedback will be much appreciated.



Other Apps worth exploring

  1. Calm
  2. Headspace
  3. Oak Meditation app

If you are interested in supporting yourself or helping the teams you manage, the links below can help you learn more about EQ training.

  1. What is EQ?
  2. Emotional Intelligence Training Course
  3. Meditation and the Science
  4. 7 reasons that emotional intelligence is quickly becoming one of the top sought job skills
  5. The secret to a high salary Emotional intelligence
  6. How to bring mindfulness into your employee wellness program
  7. Google ’Search Inside Yourself’

What is EQ? Emotional intelligence is sometimes called EQ (or EI) for short. It describes an ability or capacity to perceive, assess, and manage the emotions.

Just as a high IQ can predict top test scores, a high EQ can predict success in social and emotional situations. For most people, emotional intelligence (EQ) is more important than one’s intelligence (IQ) in attaining success in their lives and careers. As individuals the success of our careers and personal lives depend on our ability to read other people’s signals and react appropriately to them.

Jobs such as those in sales and customer service in which emotional competencies obviously make a big difference, we already intuitively know. What surprised me was from the work done at Google with their ‘Search Inside Yourself’ course. They reported that this is true even for individual contributors in the tech sector, namely engineers whom you would expect to succeed purely on intellectual prowess. The top six competencies that distinguish star performers from average performers in the tech sector are:

  1. Strong achievement drive and high achievement standards [EQ]
  2. Ability to influence [EQ]
  3. Conceptual thinking [IQ]
  4. Analytical ability [IQ]
  5. Initiative in taking on challenges [EQ]
  6. Self-confidence [EQ]

Of the top six, only two (conceptual thinking and analytical ability) are purely intellectual competencies. The other four, including the top two, are emotional competencies.

Emotions have the potential to get in the way of our most important business and personal relationships. According to John Kotter of Harvard Business School: “Because of the furious pace of change in business today, difficult to manage relationships sabotage more business than anything else – it is not a question of strategy that gets us into trouble; it is a question of emotions.”

Decades of research now points to emotional intelligence as the critical factor that sets star performers apart from the rest of the pack. It’s a powerful way to focus your energy in one direction with a tremendous results. TalentSmart tested emotional intelligence alongside 33 other important workplace skills, and found that emotional intelligence is the strongest predictor of performance, explaining a full 58 percent of success in all types of jobs.

THE FIVE CATEGORIES OF EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE (EQ)

1. Self-awareness. The ability to recognise an emotion as it “happens” is the key to your EQ. Developing self-awareness requires tuning in to your true feelings. If you evaluate your emotions, you can manage them.

2. Self-regulation. You often have little control over when you experience emotions. You can, however, have some say in how long an emotion will last by using a number of techniques to alleviate negative emotions such as anger, anxiety or depression. A few of these techniques include recasting a situation in a more positive light, taking a long walk and meditation.

3. Motivation. To motivate yourself for any achievement requires clear goals and a positive attitude. Although you may have a predisposition to either a positive or a negative attitude, you can with effort and practice learn to think more positively. If you catch negative thoughts as they occur, you can reframe them in more positive terms — which will help you achieve your goals.

4. Empathy. The ability to recognise how people feel is important to success in your life and career. The more skilful you are at discerning the feelings behind others’ signals the better you can control the signals you send them.

5. Social skills. The development of good interpersonal skills is tantamount to success in your life and career. In today’s always-connected world, everyone has immediate access to technical knowledge. Thus, “people skills” are even more important now because you must possess a high EQ to better understand, empathise and negotiate with others in a global economy.

5 SIGNS YOU HAVE HIGH EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE

A hard look at your emotional skills and weaknesses is the first step to improving EQ.

1. You know your strengths and weaknesses. A big part of having self-awareness is being honest with yourself about who you are — knowing where you excel, and where you struggle. An emotionally intelligent person learns to identify their areas of strength and weakness, and analyse how to work most effectively within their abilities.

2. You know how to pay attention. Do you get distracted by every tweet, text and passing thought? If so, it could be keeping you from functioning on your most emotionally intelligent level.

3. When you’re upset, you know exactly why. We all experience a number of emotional ups and downs during the day, and often we don’t even understand what’s causing them. But an important aspect of self-awareness is the ability to recognise where your emotions are coming from and to know why you feel upset.

4. You’ve always been self-motivated. Were you always ambitious and hard-working as a kid, even when you weren’t rewarded for it? If you’re a motivated self-starter — and you can focus your attention and energy towards the pursuit of your goals — you likely have a high EQ.

5. You’re curious about people you don’t know. Do you love meeting new people, and naturally tend to ask lots of questions after you’ve been introduced to someone? If so, you have a certain degree of empathy, one of the main components of emotional intelligence.

EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE CAN BE DEVELOPED

Some people have naturally good EQ skills. Others need to work on them. The good news is that everyone can get better. Unlike IQ, people can actually improve their emotional intelligence.  Emotional intelligence is trainable, even in adults. This claim is based on a new branch of science known as “neuroplasticity.”

So how do we train emotional intelligence? It turns out the first step is attention training. The idea is to train attention to create a quality of mind that is calm and clear at the same time. That quality of mind forms the foundation for emotional intelligence.

A strong, stable, and perceptive attention affords you calmness and clarity. It’s the foundation upon which emotional intelligence is built upon. Self-awareness depends on being able to see ourselves objectively. Requires the ability to examine our thoughts and emotions from a third-person perspective. Not to be swept up in the emotion, not identifying with it, but just seeing it clearly and objectively.

The way to train your attention is with “mindfulness meditation.” Mindfulness is defined by Jon Kabat-Zinn as “paying attention in a particular way: on purpose, in the present moment, and non-judgmentally.”

Mindfulness is a quality of mind that we all experience and enjoy from time to time. It’s something that can be made stronger with practice. Once it becomes strong, it leads to calmness and clarity that forms the basis of emotional intelligence.

Once you’ve develop strong, stable, and perceptive attention, we then focus on our bodies. Every emotion has a correlate in the body. Every emotional experience is not just a psychological experience. It’s also a physiological experience.

We can usually experience emotions more vividly in the body than in the mind. So, when we are trying to perceive an emotion, it’s more effective if we bring the attention to the body rather than the mind.

Bringing the attention to the body enables a high-resolution perception of emotions. High-resolution perception means your perception becomes so refined, you get to watch an emotion as it arises.

This attention training forms the foundation of the very first category of emotional intelligence. Self-awareness. The ability to recognise an emotion as it “happens” is the key to your EQ. Developing self-awareness requires tuning in to your true feelings. If you evaluate your emotions, you can manage them.

My years of managing dev teams lead me to develop an EQ training course. It was easy for me to develop their technical abilities but what I found, what would truly boost their careers was improving EQ skills.

I was fortunate enough to have started Tai Chi a moving meditation at a very early age. Practising Tai Chi for over 25 years has allowed me to build a solid foundation to support the most important aspect of EQ development, which is attention training.

If you are interested in supporting yourself or helping the teams you manage, the links below can help you learn more about EQ training.

  1. Emotional Intelligence Training Course
  2. Learn to meditate with the Just6 App
  3. Meditation and the Science
  4. 7 reasons that emotional intelligence is quickly becoming one of the top sought job skills
  5. The secret to a high salary Emotional intelligence
  6. How to bring mindfulness into your employee wellness program
  7. Google ’Search Inside Yourself’

Emotional intelligence has become a top skill that recruiters look out for when hiring. So how emotionally intelligent are you? EQ is trainable, even in adults.

Emotional intelligence has become a top skill that recruiters look out for when hiring. How emotionally intelligent are you, and how can you improve?

Modern work trends and rapid technological advancements both point very strongly to one skill becoming vitally important for workers: emotional intelligence.

The difference now, however, is that HR professionals frequently list soft skills as one of the top skills they look for during the candidate selection process.

Amid anxiety about how the AI revolution may impact employability, it is in the interest of jobseekers to nurture soft skills, because they are (currently) difficult to automate.

It’s easy to think that soft skills are immutable traits granted at birth that cannot be improved upon. It’s also easy to resign yourself to the fact that soft skills are difficult to quantify and therefore you can neither get a definitive read on your level of emotional intelligence nor can you ever hope to improve it.

Fortunately, none of these things are true. You can, and will, be able to gauge and improve how emotionally intelligent you are.

NetCredit has created this nifty infographic to help you determine how intelligent you are emotionally, and how to develop those skills.

It breaks down emotional intelligence into three subheadings: how you use emotions, how you manage emotions and how you understand emotions.

If you find yourself unable to determine what kind of emotions another person might be feeling – or even if you find your own emotions hard to name – you can combat this with practice. Set aside a few minutes a day for introspection, such as by keeping a journal or just letting yourself meditate on how you’re feeling, and why you may be feeling it.

You can also give yourself an ‘empathy workout’, so to speak, by quizzing yourself on how you think the people around you might be feeling. It doesn’t have to be people you know – you could create a narrative for someone while people-watching and think about what it would be like to be in their shoes.

If emotional regulation is an issue for you, try giving yourself some distance from an emotional trigger before reacting. You can use sensory stimulation such as a splash of cold water or the smell of lavender to reduce your anxiety levels.

Maybe you want to learn to harness your emotions better. You can try using a notebook to identify emotional triggers and reinterpret them.

For example, if someone you’re chatting to frowns or looks at their watch, you may be inclined to think they are bored by your presence. Ask yourself if there is another reason they could be behaving like this. Perhaps their mind is clouded with stress unrelated to you, or maybe they’re worried about missing an appointment and hence, they’re checking the time frequently.

For some more tips, as well as a flowchart to help you identify where you could improve, check out the infographic below.

how intelligent are you infographic

Original article was from www.siliconrepublic.com


I was fortunate enough to have started Tai Chi a moving meditation at a very early age. Practising Tai Chi for over 25 years has allowed me to build a solid foundation to support the most important aspect of EQ development, which is attention training.

If you are interested in supporting yourself or helping the teams you manage, the links below can help you learn more about EQ training.

  1. What is EQ?
  2. Emotional Intelligence Training Course
  3. Learn to meditate with the Just6 App
  4. Meditation and the Science
  5. 7 reasons that emotional intelligence is quickly becoming one of the top sought job skills
  6. The secret to a high salary Emotional intelligence
  7. How to bring mindfulness into your employee wellness program
  8. Google ’Search Inside Yourself’

Research shows that people with strong emotional intelligence are more successful than those with high IQs or relevant experience. Plus EQ is trainable.

Thought I should share this post I found at FactCompany written by Harvey Deutschendorf that shows why emotionally intelligent people are more successful.

Research shows that people with strong emotional intelligence are more likely to succeed than those with high IQs or relevant experience.

We’ve learned that emotional intelligence (EQ) is a crucial skill for both leaders and employees. But several studies point to just how important EQ can be to success, even trumping IQ and experience.

Research by the respected Center for Creative Leadership (CCL) in the U.S. found that the primary causes of executive derailment involve deficiencies in emotional competence. Each year, CCL serves more than 20,000 individuals and 2,000 organizations, including more than 80 of the Fortune 100 companies. It says the three main reasons for failure are difficulty in handling change, inability to work well in a team, and poor interpersonal relations.

International search firm Egon Zehnder International analyzed 515 senior executives and discovered that those who were strongest in emotional intelligence were more likely to succeed than those strongest in either IQ or relevant previous experience. Research that has been done on the relationship between emotional intelligence (EQ) and IQ has shown only a weak correlation between the two.

The Carnegie Institute of Technology carried out research that showed that 85% of our financial success was due to skills in “human engineering”, personality, and ability to communicate, negotiate, and lead. They found that only 15% was due to technical ability. In other words people skills or skills highly related to emotional intelligence were crucial skills. Nobel Prize winning Israeli-American psychologist Daniel Kahneman found that people would rather do business with a person they like and trust rather than someone they don’t, even if that that person is offering a better product at a lower price.

To test out his findings, think of the last time you purchased a major item, a home, automobile, or large appliance where you had to dealings with a salesperson. Was the person someone who you liked and trusted? In my talks, I have found that whenever I asked that question, inevitably the entire audience answered that, yes, the person they bought a large item from was someone they liked and trusted. This theory about why salespeople with the right people skills do better than those who lack them is borne out by a study carried out by the Hay/McBer Research and Innovation Group in 1997. In a study carried out in a large national insurance company in 1997, they found that sales agents weak in emotional areas such as self-confidence, initiative, and empathy sold policies with an average premium of $54,000, while those strong in 5 of 8 emotional competencies sold policies on the average worth $114,000.

Much of the research that has been done on emotional intelligence has been at the executive leadership level. The higher up the organization, the more crucial emotional intelligence abilities are as the impacts are greater and felt throughout the entire organization. There have been some studies, however, that show impacts at all levels.

For example, a study by McClelland in 1999 showed that after supervisors in a manufacturing plant received training in emotional competencies such as how to listen better, lost-time accidents decreased by 50% and grievances went down from 15 per year to three. The plant itself exceeded productivity goals by $250,000.

The same principles apply in all areas of life, whether at work or in relationships. Everyone wants to work with people who are easy to get along with, supportive, likeable, and can be trusted. We want to be beside people that do not get upset easily and can keep their composure when things do not work out according to plan.

How Do You Hire Emotionally Intelligent People?

Self-awareness. The first thing that is essential for any degree of emotional intelligence is self-awareness. People with a high degree of self-awareness have a solid understanding of their own emotions, their strengths, weaknesses, and what drives them. Neither overly critical nor unrealistically hopeful, these people are honest with themselves and others. These people recognize how their feelings impact them, other people around them, and their performance at work. They have a good understanding of their values and goals and where they are going in life. They are confident as well as aware of their limitations and less likely to set themselves up for failure.

We can recognize self-aware people by their willingness to talk about themselves in a frank, non-defensive manner. A good interview question is to ask about a time that the interviewee got carried away by their emotions and did something they later regretted. The self-aware person will be open and frank with their answers. Self-deprecating humor is a good indicator of someone who has good self-awareness. Red flags are people who stall or try to avoid the question, seem irritated, or frustrated by the question.

Ability To Self-Regulate Emotions. We all have emotions which drive us and there is nothing we can do to avoid them. People who are good at self-regulation, however, are able to manage their emotions so that they do not control their words and actions. While they feel bad moods and impulses as much as anyone else, they do not act upon them. People who act upon their negative feelings create havoc, disruptions, and lasting bad feelings all around them. We feel before we think and people who constantly react from an emotional state never wait long enough to allow their thoughts to override their emotions.

People who self-regulate have the ability to wait until their emotions pass, allowing them to respond from a place of reason, rather than simply reacting to feelings. The signs of someone who is good at self-regulation are reflection, thoughtfulness, comfort with ambiguity, change, and not having all the answers. In an interview, look for people who take a little time to reflect and think before they answer.

Empathy. Empathy is another important aspect to look for when hiring. Someone who has empathy will have an awareness of the feelings of others and consider those feelings in their words and actions. This does not mean that they will tiptoe around or be unwilling to make tough decisions for fear of hurting someone’s feelings. It simply means that they are aware of, and take into consideration the impact on others. They are willing to share their own worries and concerns and openly acknowledge other’s emotions. A good way to look for empathy in an interview is to ask a candidate about a situation where a co-worker was angry with them and how they dealt with it. Look for a willingness to understand the source of the co-workers anger, even though they may not agree with the reasons for it.

Social skills. Social skill is another area of emotional intelligence that is highly important in the workplace. To have good social skills requires a high level of the other skills aforementioned as well as the ability to relate and find common ground with a wide range of people. It goes beyond just friendliness and the ability to get along with others.

People with social skills are excellent team players as they have the ability to move an agenda along and keep focus while at the same time remaining aware of the emotional climate of the group and possess the ability to respond to it. These people are excellent at making connections, networking, and bringing people together to work on projects. They are able to bring their emotional intelligence skills into play in a larger arena. To look for social skills in an interview, ask questions related to projects and difficulties encountered around varying agendas, temperaments, and getting people to buy in.


I was fortunate enough to have started Tai Chi a moving meditation at a very early age. Practising Tai Chi for over 25 years has allowed me to build a solid foundation to support the most important aspect of EQ development, which is attention training.

If you are interested in supporting yourself or helping the teams you manage, the links below can help you learn more about EQ training.

  1. What is EQ?
  2. Emotional Intelligence Training Course
  3. Learn to meditate with the Just6 App
  4. Meditation and the Science
  5. 7 reasons that emotional intelligence is quickly becoming one of the top sought job skills
  6. The secret to a high salary Emotional intelligence
  7. How to bring mindfulness into your employee wellness program
  8. Google ’Search Inside Yourself’