I was never a huge fan of colouring books as a child. As an adult, however, colouring books improve you emotionally & mentally, I’m a fan! Maybe because I’ve come a long way in my ability to stay inside the lines.

I found this article written by Robyn Reisch I thought it would be worth sharing. Ten Ways Adult Colouring Books Improve Your Emotional, Mental and Intellectual Health

I was never a huge fan of colouring books as a child. As an adult, however, I absolutely love them! Maybe it’s because I’ve come a long way in my ability to stay inside the lines. Whatever the reason, I am glad to have made the shift. I am the proud owner of colouring books depicting Harry Potter, Game of Thrones, and, of course, a magical garden. The stress relief that they provide is fantastic, and the sense of accomplishment after finishing a page may feel silly, but it is real! Thankfully, therapists around the world have given this practice a collective nod of approval.

HERE’S WHY:

1. People who suffer from trauma, PTSD, and excessive stress can benefit from colouring, as it is known to calm the amygdala. This is the part of the brain that, when activated, induces a fight-or-flight reaction. People with these conditions are often kept in a state of extreme worry and hyper-vigilance due to an overly active amygdala.

2. The decision to colour is a decision to spend time on something that is just for us. As adults, we often neglect to do this until we face a crisis that reminds us of the importance of self-care. Colouring is a simple daily reminder that our happiness matters.

3. Colouring forces us to practice mindfulness, which can ease symptoms of anxiety and depression. The practice of mindfulness can also promote feelings of fulfillment and joy.

4. Both the right hemisphere and the left hemisphere of the brain are used in balance when we colour. This is because we are completing a concrete task and using fine motor skills, while also thinking in an abstract way regarding the artful balance of pigments on the page.

5. Colouring uses the same areas of the brain that help us to focus and concentrate. By utilizing this part of the brain, we can increase our capacity for attentive thought.

6. Coloring also uses the area of the brain that is responsible for organizational and problem solving skills. By exercising it, we can significantly strengthen our adulting skills.

7. Does pulling out the coloured pencils soothe your soul? It’s no wonder. Colouring can induce feelings of comfort and nostalgia in those who enjoyed this activity as a child.

8. Colouring injects our lives with a much needed dose of creativity. As adults, we are often tasked with the same acts of tedium over and over again. This can dampen our creative spirit, and decrease our capacity for creative problem solving. Colouring is a way to add a creative outlet that does not involve extra stress or a serious time commitment.

9. A coloring routine can combat boredom and a lack of structure, both of which are known to contribute to a myriad of mental health issues. These include depression, anxiety, stress, substance abuse, eating disorders, anger management problems, and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

10. Colouring mandalas is thought to have spiritual benefits, increasing our capacity for self-knowledge and connecting us to humanity and our world.

Colouring has been compared to meditation for its ability to calm the mind and feed the soul. With so many options when it comes to coloring books, there is sure to be one that suits your tastes. Take up the practice yourself, or give one to your stress-addled sister to help her make it through finals week. They are a whimsical way to look back on the good times, as well as a practical tool with which to cope with the problems we face in the present.


I was fortunate enough to have started Tai Chi a moving meditation at a very early age. Practising Tai Chi for over 25 years has allowed me to build a solid foundation to support the most important aspect of EQ development, which is attention training.

If you are interested in supporting yourself or helping the teams you manage, the links below can help you learn more about EQ training.

  1. What is EQ?
  2. Emotional Intelligence Training Course
  3. Learn to meditate with the Just6 App
  4. Meditation and the Science
  5. 7 reasons that emotional intelligence is quickly becoming one of the top sought job skills
  6. The secret to a high salary Emotional intelligence
  7. How to bring mindfulness into your employee wellness program
  8. Google ’Search Inside Yourself’

As a potential candidate, you might look great on paper. See why emotional intelligence is vital for career advancement. Learn how to boost your EQ. Do you have the emotional intelligence it takes to be a great addition to your employer’s team?

As a potential candidate, you might look great on paper. But do you have the emotional intelligence it takes to be a great addition to your employer’s team?

How well you do in your career and life is not determined by how high your IQ is, but rather how high your EQ is.

What’s the difference between IQ and EQ? Traditional measures of intelligence (IQ scores) do not encompass the full range of capabilities of a person. While EQ measures your ability to express, observe, and communicate with emotions. In a way that is beneficial to everyone involved.

Strong EQ for success

While a good IQ may open doors, studies show that it only accounts for 20 per cent of success in life. In the real world, success is influenced by personal qualities. Such as perseverance, self-control and skills in getting along with others — in other words, a strong EQ.

Most recruiters live by this adage: “Hire for personality; train for skill” and are likely to look for people who have a high EQ. In fact, many organizations now include EQ tests before hiring employees. Others have initiated EQ training programs in the workplace.

Why your EQ matters

Many companies are changing their hiring methods to hire people with high EQ. They particularly look for people with the prime EQ qualities of self – awareness, self-regulation, motivation, empathy and social skills.

The good news is, unlike IQ, emotional intelligence can be learned and improved with practice. Here are five EQ qualities to master.

Self-awareness

To control your emotions, you must be aware of them. This is where self-awareness comes into play. Those who are self-aware are able to tune into their emotions, which makes them more confident about what they can do and what they have to offer.

Self-regulation

If you’re not in control of your emotions, you can become combative in the workplace or resistant to change. Those who can control their emotions, avoid the temptation to indulge impulses. They take responsibility for their own actions, adapt well in the face of change, and are open to new ideas.

Motivation

Motivated individuals are striving to improve, to meet the next milestone. They are also less likely to get discouraged when faced with setbacks or opposition. Motivated individuals make great sales and marketing professionals. And are often the morale boosters of an organization.

Empathy

Empathy is the ability to recognize how people feel and how your actions can affect them. Those with empathy are perfect for the service sector, and they also make great mediators and negotiators. Since they can pick up on how others feel, they are in a better position to motivate them.

Social skills

Social skills are important regardless of what type of career you have. Successful people communicate effectively. Great communicators are needed for conflict management, team management, leadership roles and tasks where co-operation is necessary.

These five EQ traits can determine how successful you’ll become in the workplace, and your personal relationships as well.

In a world where information is a click away, emotional intelligence will gain greater significance in the days to come. In the modern workplace, the ideal candidate would have a highly analytical brain, while still carrying the attributes of an emotionally intelligent person. A good employee with high EQ can do wonders for a company, take them to new levels and be a source of sustained growth.



I was fortunate enough to have started Tai Chi a moving meditation at a very early age. Practising Tai Chi for over 25 years has allowed me to build a solid foundation to support the most important aspect of EQ development, which is attention training.

If you are interested in supporting yourself or helping the teams you manage, the links below can help you learn more about EQ training.

  1. What is EQ?
  2. Emotional Intelligence Training Course
  3. Learn to meditate with the Just6 App
  4. Meditation and the Science
  5. 7 reasons that emotional intelligence is quickly becoming one of the top sought job skills
  6. The secret to a high salary Emotional intelligence
  7. How to bring mindfulness into your employee wellness program
  8. Google ’Search Inside Yourself’

Featured image from unspalsh – by Clem Onojeghuo

5 ways you can teach yourself and boost your employees emotional intelligence – mindfulness meditation can assist – beginning steps to self awareness. See our EQ course for your employees.

To read the original post head over to gineersnow.com Yes, cognitive intelligence is pretty useful. It helps people solve problems easily, enables their critical thinking to analyze a project more, and helps them think of more out-of-the-box ideas. But what’s the point of that if that intelligent worker of yours breaks down easily in the face of stress, or takes criticisms way too personally? That’s why emotional intelligence is important too, and as a boss in an engineering firm or company, you and your employees have to learn to build on it. Here are 5 ways you can teach yourself and your employees to be more emotionally intelligent.

Assess strengths and weaknesses

People often get derailed from themselves because there’s a gap between how they see themselves and how others see them. It’s at this point where you and your employees need to know what exactly their strengths and weaknesses are; Not just by letting them think about it, but by pointing out other’s strengths and weaknesses that they may not have realized before. Teach yourself and others to be open to feedback. Let them examine their performance reviews. People need to understand themselves realistically to understand where they need to grow.

Change perspectives

Now that everyone knows what they can do well and what they need to improve on, it’s time to teach them to be considerate of others too. When they’re focused too much on themselves, they fail to consider what others might be going through as well. So teach them to be understanding and patient. Teach them to put themselves in other people’s shoes and realize that their way of doing things isn’t the only way, and it may not work on others.

Tackle stress

It’s a scientific fact that emotion will always fire faster that logic, and in times of stress, it’s more likely for one’s logic center to malfunction. In the world of engineering, letting emotions affect the quality of your work can be dangerous for whatever you’re creating, so we need to learn to handle the stress so that it will never happen. Stress is most often caused when someone feels cornered and there’s little to no way out of the situation, so giving them several options to do something can help them avoid it. There are several other ways too, by trying to reduce the workload if possible, getting more sleep, avoiding too much coffee, or even just a simple 10 minute break.

Keep a diary

This may be cheesy, but it’s actually pretty useful. Keeping a simple journal wherein you note what you feel and when you felt it helps them recognize their own and other’s behavioral patterns. It helps them look at themselves easier and realize the bad habits they may have to break or learn how to respond to a situation better. View information of the EQ courses for engineers


I was fortunate enough to have started Tai Chi a moving meditation at a very early age. Practising Tai Chi for over 25 years has allowed me to build a solid foundation to support the most important aspect of EQ development, which is attention training.

If you are interested in supporting yourself or helping the teams you manage, the links below can help you learn more about EQ training.

  1. What is EQ?
  2. Emotional Intelligence Training Course
  3. Learn to meditate with the Just6 App
  4. Meditation and the Science
  5. 7 reasons that emotional intelligence is quickly becoming one of the top sought job skills
  6. The secret to a high salary Emotional intelligence
  7. How to bring mindfulness into your employee wellness program
  8. Google ’Search Inside Yourself’

In emotional intelligence, self-control is a personal competence developed in every good leader. Learn the 1 emotional intelligence skill you need to be hugely successful. This skill can be developed, we can show you how with our course.

I saw this article posted on inc.com and it is so true. The 1 Emotional Intelligence Skill You Need to Be Hugely Successful. Think about a work scenario in your past when the proverbial fit hit the shan. Perhaps an unforeseen circumstance that led to a massive layoff. Or a mistake that sent your biggest client packing for a competitor. How did your leadership team or immediate boss respond during the crisis? Was he rock solid, calm, clear-headed, optimistic, and a beacon of light for the team? Or did he have a bad reaction, throw temper tantrums, point fingers at other people, and further act on impulse with more bad choices that sent morale and productivity spiraling? We have a leadership term for the latter scenario. In emotional intelligence studies, it’s called self-management, or lack thereof, in this case. I prefer a more generic term that is equally effective for further discussion: Self-control.

Why Self-Control Matters for Leaders

Ancient wisdom says that “a person without self-control is like a house with its doors and windows knocked out.” You become defenseless and open yourself up to harm. In a business sense, harm here equals losing influence, respect and trust from those you lead. Why is this the case? Lets back up a bit. In emotional intelligence, self-control (or “self-management”) is a personal competence developed in every good leader. The question behind self-control is: Can I manage my emotions and behavior to a positive outcome? Internationally known psychologist and best-selling author, Daniel Goleman, says this about leaders with self-control:

“Reasonable people–the ones who maintain control over their emotions–are the people who can sustain safe, fair environments. In these settings, drama is very low and productivity is very high. Top performers flock to these organizations and are not apt to leave them.”

If leaders have no capacity for self-control, the flip side is not good. How do you think it impacts an organization’s performance? A company’s bottom line? Relationships? Stress?

What a Lack of Self-Control Will Do

One of the major obstacles stemming from a lack of self-control is unfiltered anger. Who will ever forget last year’s unfortunate and very publicized incident involving the CEO of Restoration Hardware Holdings Inc., who went off on his whole company with a flaming internal memo written mostly with the caps lock on. Instead of displaying leadership during a decline in customer service that led to an increase in canceled orders, he reacted adversely and spared no one with threats of termination. While I wasn’t in the building and have not interviewed people at Restoration, I’ll make a small wager with anyone that employees were disengaged and unhappy, which may have affected their performance. Any takers? Anger is one powerful, and quite normal, human emotion. But it needs to be expressed in a healthy way. There’s a place and time for appropriate anger, and we all have to learn how to manage it, or it will manage us. Self-control takes care of that.

How to Improve Self-Control

Self-control, along with mindfulness, are skills we teach and coach leaders so they have the capacity to be present, calm and focused during times of high stress. It’s a necessary virtue with long term payoff. Here are 5 ways a leader can improve self-control:

1. Identify your feelings.

Is there a strong emotion behind missing a deadline, hesitation about a meeting, or an intuitive sense that the environment you are working in may not be the right fit for you? The starting point is always to exercise self-awareness before you act on your emotions.

2. Figure out what your triggers are.

If you lost self-control, it can be a learning moment. What triggered you to just lose it? It’s likely a reaction to something much deeper, perhaps unresolved. Whatever is at the bottom of the pile needs to be taken care of first–that’s the primary emotion causing the unwanted secondary like anger, fear, or guilt. So what’s really bugging you?

3. Be aware of when it happens.

Does it happen during times of stress? Fear? Anxiety? Exhaustion? For me, my self-control is at its lowest when I’m tired after a long day of work. I get especially grumpy and irritable but I’m aware of it enough to resist any temptation to make a really bad choice.

4. Be intentional and take massive action.

Now that you know the real cause of your negative emotion, be intentional about breaking the cycle. Was your reaction appropriate to begin with? Was it directed at the right time, or to the right person? Maybe the lesson is to learn a more proactive response, or better decision-making. Perhaps it’s to not act at all, but just “be” and listen more to other perspectives before pulling the trigger.

5. Change your mindset.

The power of choice, saying in your heart of hearts, “this is who I choose to be” rather than “this is who I am,” will cause your paradigm to shift, leading to more self-control and less impulsiveness. But don’t be fooled, a new mindset will take a lot of work, practice, and self-discipline until behaviors become habitual.

Bringing It Home

Self-control is crucial for leaders and managers at all levels because no employee wants to work for someone who is not in control of themselves and their emotions, especially during difficult times. Leading by fear, yelling, and bullying is an extinct custom that has no place in the current social economy which values relationships, collaboration, and authenticity.


I was fortunate enough to have started Tai Chi a moving meditation at a very early age. Practising Tai Chi for over 25 years has allowed me to build a solid foundation to support the most important aspect of EQ development, which is attention training.

If you are interested in supporting yourself or helping the teams you manage, the links below can help you learn more about EQ training.

  1. What is EQ?
  2. Emotional Intelligence Training Course
  3. Learn to meditate with the Just6 App
  4. Meditation and the Science
  5. 7 reasons that emotional intelligence is quickly becoming one of the top sought job skills
  6. The secret to a high salary Emotional intelligence
  7. How to bring mindfulness into your employee wellness program
  8. Google ’Search Inside Yourself’

Emotional intelligence may be the most important soft skill for the workforce of tomorrow. Emotional intelligence becomes a key ingredient for successful teams. Can you train for emotional intelligence? Yes see our course to help youy and your employees.

Found this article here. Thought I would share.

As technology evolves faster than workers’ technical skills can keep up, employers are being forced to upskill employees on their own. To that end, they’re focused on workers with good “learnability,“ experts say.

But they’re not just training on technical skills; they’re trying to teach communication, leadership, time management and, increasingly, emotional intelligence. EI (or EQ) is generally considered a self-awareness that allows an individual to identify and express their own emotions and manage their response to things that trigger them. It allows us to recognize and understand emotional responses in others and influence them, if needed. But can you really train for EI?

Training for EI

Most experts agree EI is not an inherent trait: As children, we were trained to manage our emotions. If our parents were successful, we don’t throw temper tantrums as adults. In the workplace, EI is a valuable skill; after all, few work in a complete vacuum, and relationships between colleagues at all levels are influenced by emotions. The ability to recognize triggers and manage responses is a necessity. The ability to recognize what triggers others and influence them is a skill.

EI can be refined to help workers control their own emotions and build stronger relationships with peers. Managing disruptive, knee-jerk responses to emotional triggers reduces unwanted behaviors. And the ability to tap into positive, self-driving emotions — like confidence and enthusiasm — lead to more beneficial outcomes. EI can help manage conflict, lead through challenges and build relationships.

EI is learned and developed over the course of one’s life, according to Marc Brackett, founding director of the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence and a founding advisor at the Oji Life Lab. “We’re not born with a rich emotional vocabulary or the knowledge of how regulate our feelings,” he told HR Dive. We’re taught to control our emotions and while we all feel emotions throughout the workday, “EI development provides the ability to articulate and manage them effectively.”

Why it’s so important

It’s easy to see where that fits into the workplace. “Emotional intelligence becomes a key ingredient for successful teams and the relationships between managers and their direct reports,“ Kristen Fyfe-Mills, associate director, communications at The Association for Talent Development told HR Dive via email. “It is an ingredient that can fuel collaboration and cooperation across teams and contributes to a positive culture.”

When someone has cultivated their emotional intelligence, they’re often able to see with a broader lens, not just their own perspective and experience of the world, according to Shelley Osborne, head of learning and development at Udemy. In the workplace, this can translate to increased empathy, self-awareness, accountability and, ultimately, improved relationship management, she said.

“Work is all about people and interactions,” according to Robin Stern, associate director of partnerships at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence and an Oji Life Lab founding advisor. ”Emotions impact our focus and our ability to work, to make good decisions and judgments. Emotions are contagious,” she said. Similarly, the ability to read emotions is important: they guide us to avoid or approach people, she explained, which affects teams and collaboration.

It makes sense, then, that employers might want leaders with high EI. “Someone with high emotional intelligence assumes good intent and avoids jumping to conclusions when interacting with their colleagues,” according to Osborne. They don’t immediately point fingers when experiencing a conflict with a co-worker. “They seek to understand and uncover the core of the issue and better understand others’ perspectives,” she said.

Teamwork and collaboration stand to benefit the most, according to Kathi Enderes, VP of talent and workforce research at Bersin, Deloitte Consulting LLP. Those items are “at the heart of today’s most successful organizations, and team members who are emotionally intelligent will work together best,” she wrote to HR Dive.

Selling it to employees

​EI can help anyone work better together, according Andrea Hoban, Oji Life Lab’s head of learning. She said she works with a wide array of clients, from surgeons to ship builders and everyone in between. “It’s acknowledgement that if I don’t know how I’m feeling, I may have an unregulated response that could create a relationship that’s difficult.”

And while it may seem insulting to tell employees they need to improve their emotional control, a good pitch can make the difference. Approaching the issue from the perspective of building stronger awareness and more cohesive relationships may be the key.

Teams may be interested to know that such training can help them work more effectively together. For some groups, like nurses and physicians, Hoban said, it even enhances their ability to work with patients and their families more successfully. The training can benefit personal relationships, she noted, even giving individuals the tools to deal with teenage children.

Even employees or leaders who may already have strong emotional intelligence can stand to uncover areas with room for improvement, said Osborne; “Self-awareness is a key component of emotional intelligence and employees who seek honest feedback will reap the rewards of personal and professional development as a result.”

Added bonuses for the future of work

Leaders with high EI also may be critical to their organizations’ futures. “Emotional intelligence is a key factor to unlock inclusion and innovation,“ said Enderes. A team with emotionally intelligent members will generate more ideas, create more opportunities to voice these ideas and provide more contribution to the overall business.

It’s also perhaps the only component of intelligence that machines have not mastered (yet) and therefore is the only difference between humans and artificial intelligence, according to Enderes; ”As automation replaces tasks that machines are best at, having people that are best at what humans do – empathy, sensing, adjusting interactions – will enable businesses to create a powerful human/machine collaboration.”


I was fortunate enough to have started Tai Chi a moving meditation at a very early age. Practising Tai Chi for over 25 years has allowed me to build a solid foundation to support the most important aspect of EQ development, which is attention training.

If you are interested in supporting yourself or helping the teams you manage, the links below can help you learn more about EQ training.

  1. What is EQ?
  2. Emotional Intelligence Training Course
  3. Learn to meditate with the Just6 App
  4. Meditation and the Science
  5. 7 reasons that emotional intelligence is quickly becoming one of the top sought job skills
  6. The secret to a high salary Emotional intelligence
  7. How to bring mindfulness into your employee wellness program
  8. Google ’Search Inside Yourself’

So, if you’re looking to build your emotional intelligence, where do you start? 21 Ways to Improve Your Emotional Intelligence (in Just a Few Minutes a Day). See our EQ course.

Found this post here, thought I would share. Emotional intelligence is experiencing a resurgence. The concept–that we can develop the ability to identify, understand, and manage emotions–has been around for a while. But it’s gained steam in recent years, partially due to the polarizing climate in which we currently live. In addition, many in younger generations are discovering the basic tenets of “EQ” (and their benefits) for the first time.

So, if you’re looking to build your emotional intelligence, where do you start?

In my new book, _EQ Applied: The Real-World Guide to Emotional Intelligence, _I outline a number of clear, practical tips that you can implement in your daily routine, most of which take only a few minutes a day. 

Here are 21 of my favorites:

1. Ask and reflect.

Carve out some time this week to answer a few of the following questions. Then, ask them of someone you trust. 

  • How do my moods affect my thoughts and decision-making? 
  • How would I (or you) describe my communication style, and its effect on others?
  • What traits in others bother me? Why? 
  • Do I find it difficult to admit when I’m wrong? Why or why not? 
  • What are my strengths? What are my weaknesses? 

Think deeply about the answers, using them to better understand yourself and your emotions.

2. Use your emotional vocabulary.

When a doctor tries to diagnose a problem, he or she will ask you to describe the pain you’re feeling. They might ask you to use words like sharp, dull, burning, shooting, aching, cramping, gnawing, heavy, splitting, stabbing, nauseating, throbbing, and tender. The more specific you get, the easier for your doctor to diagnose the problem and prescribe proper treatment. 

It works similarly with your emotions: By using specific words to describe your feelings, it’s easier to get to their root cause, enabling you to better deal with them. So, the next time you experience a strong emotional reaction, take time afterward to process not only what you’re feeling, but also why. Try to put your feelings into words; then, determine what you want to do about the situation. 

3. Pause.

If you feel yourself beginning to respond emotionally to a situation, take a pause. If possible, go for a short walk. Once you’ve had the chance to calm down, come back and decide how you want to move forward. 

4. Use the 3-second trick.

If you tend to put your foot in your mouth, agree too quickly to commitments, or otherwise say something you later regret, ask yourself three quick questions (which I learned from Craig Ferguson) before speaking:

  • Does this need to be said?
  • Does this need to be said by me?
  • Does this need to be said by me, now?

In contrast, if you’re more introverted and often find that later you wish you had expressed yourself in a specific moment or situation, ask yourself:

Will I regret not speaking up later? 

The right question(s) can help you manage your emotional reactions and avoid regrets.

5. Adjust your volume.

When you communicate, your conversation partner will often react in the same style or tone you choose. If you speak in a calm, rational voice, they’ll respond similarly. Yell or scream, and they start yelling and screaming, too. 

If a discussion begins to escalate, focus your efforts on “dialing it back” by softening your tone or even lowering your voice. You’ll be surprised at how your partner follows your lead. 

6. Think before addressing sensitive topics.

Before revisiting a touchy topic, give careful thought as to where and when to speak, with the goal of having a calm and rational discussion. 

It’s also important to consider how you will reintroduce the subject. For example, opening with an apology, with an expression of gratitude, or by acknowledging where you and your communication partner agree may lead the other person to lower his or her guard and become more open to what you have to say.

7. Fast-forward.

If emotion is clouding your judgment, take a moment to fast-forward and consider the consequences of your actions–both short- and long-term. Doing so can help you achieve clarity of mind and make sound decisions that you’re proud of. 

8. Learn from negative emotions.

If you find yourself struggling with negative emotions, ask yourself: What is this feeling telling me? Can I use this emotion to motivate me to make a change? 

9. Learn from emotional hijacks.

An “emotional hijack” is a situation in which you completely lose control of your emotions. Often, it’s a series of circumstances or events that culminates in an action that pushes you “over the edge.”

When you experience an emotional hijack, try to examine what happened by asking yourself:

  • Why did I react the way I did? 
  • What would I change if I could do it again? 
  • What could I say to myself next time that would help me think more clearly? 

Once you begin to understand _why _you reacted the way you did, you can train your default reaction so you respond differently next time. 

10. Learn to say no.

It’s great to be kind and helpful to others, but you have your limits. If you say yes to every request for your time and energy, you put yourself on the path to burnout.

And remember, every time you say yes to something you don’t really want, you’re actually saying no to the things you do want.

11. Ask for feedback.

Get specific. For example, authors Sheila Heen and Douglas Stone advise asking your manager or a trusted colleague:

  •  ”What’s one thing you see me doing (or failing to do) that holds me back?”

12. Turn criticism into constructive feedback.

When you receive criticism, resist the urge to take it personally. Instead, focus on answering two questions: 

  • Putting my personal feelings aside, what can I learn from this alternate perspective? 
  • How can I use this feedback to help me improve? 

Remember that most criticism is rooted in truth. And even when it isn’t, it gives you a valuable window into the perspective of others.

13. Learn from commendation.

The next time someone commends you, thank this person politely. Later, ask yourself the following: 

  • What can I learn from this commendation? 
  • What did I do well? How can I repeat it?
  • Who helped me perform well? Can I, in turn, thank or praise the person who praised me, too? 

14. Practice empathy.

When a person tells you about a personal struggle, listen carefully. Resist the urge to judge the person or situation, to interrupt and share your personal experience, or to propose a solution. Instead, focus on understanding the how and why: how the person feels, and why he or she feels that way. 

Then, ask yourself: 

  • When have I felt similar to what this person has described?

Once you have a better understanding of how the person feels, try to relate to their feelings. 

15. Commend others.

For one month, schedule 20 minutes a week to reflect on what you appreciate about someone important to you. It could be your significant other (or another member of your family), a friend, a business partner, or a colleague.

Then, take a moment to write this person a short note, give them a call, or go see them in person. Tell them specifically how they help you or what you value about them. Don’t address any other topics or problems; just show some love. 

16. Fight fear–with knowledge.

Strive to identify situations where others use fear to influence your feelings and actions. Since we tend to fear the unknown, research the facts and consider opposing opinions before passing judgment or making a decision. Endeavor to see the whole picture. 

17. Learn to say sorry.

There are probably no two words harder to say than the following: 

“I’m sorry.“ 

But by learning to acknowledge your mistakes and apologize when appropriate, you’ll develop qualities like humility and authenticity, naturally drawing others to you. Additionally, remember that apologizing isn’t always about right and wrong; it’s about valuing your relationships more than your ego.

18. Forgive.

Refusing to forgive is like leaving a knife in a wound–you never give yourself the chance to heal. 

Instead of hanging on to resentment while the offending party moves on with life, forgiving gives you the chance to move on, too.

19. Be honest. (But keep it respectful.)

Being authentic means sharing your true thoughts and feelings with others, realizing that not everyone will agree with you, and being OK with that. But honesty must be practiced with respect if you want to gain the respect of others. 

Authenticity doesn’t mean sharing everything about yourself, with everyone, all of the time. It _does _mean saying what you mean, meaning what you say, and sticking to your values and principles above all else. 

20. Keep your guard up.

Beware of persons who constantly seek to stroke your ego, push a relationship to levels you’re not ready for, or are quick to show warmth and affection but then quickly lose their temper or find other ways to “punish” you when they don’t get their way. 

If a relationship seems to be moving too fast, don’t be afraid to slow things down. And don’t be afraid to say no when appropriate. 

21. Control your thoughts.

When you experience a negative situation, it’s difficult to control your feelings. But when you focus on your thoughts, you can control your reactions to those feelings. 

Don’t try to ignore your feelings; instead, acknowledge them. Then, move forward in a way that’s in harmony with your goals and values.


I was fortunate enough to have started Tai Chi a moving meditation at a very early age. Practising Tai Chi for over 25 years has allowed me to build a solid foundation to support the most important aspect of EQ development, which is attention training.

If you are interested in supporting yourself or helping the teams you manage, the links below can help you learn more about EQ training.

  1. What is EQ?
  2. Emotional Intelligence Training Course
  3. Learn to meditate with the Just6 App
  4. Meditation and the Science
  5. 7 reasons that emotional intelligence is quickly becoming one of the top sought job skills
  6. The secret to a high salary Emotional intelligence
  7. How to bring mindfulness into your employee wellness program
  8. Google ’Search Inside Yourself’

Making your brands accessible, relevant & relatable to a broader set of consumers can produce feelings of uncertainty, anxiety & even fear. Boost your brand with an EQ course.

Been awhile since I shared. Found this for you the Just Being family. Origial article.

Customer experience and customer journeys are a subject that has been popping up recently at conferences and in articles and blogs. Indeed, most marketers are prioritizing the concept of creating personalized and friction-free customer experiences. However, I wonder how often we ask which customers and whose journeys we are trying to understand and enhance.

This is important because it’s possible that many of us define our customer base in a limited manner — perhaps in a way that is familiar, comfortable and safe. Consider that today’s U.S. consumers are racially and culturally diverse; even within the same race and culture, they are diverse. In fact, census projections indicate that by the year 2020, about half of Gen Z, Gen Y and Gen X will be multicultural, and future growth of Gen Z and Gen Y segments will come primarily from multicultural markets. I emphasize these segments because they are sweet spots for many marketers.

There are also increasingly greater numbers of intercultural relationships and marriages, and these couples have young children, teens and young adults who are growing up in multicultural households. Even non-Hispanic white consumers are increasingly different culturally than they were twenty years ago: They are continuously influenced by other cultures, by the geographies in which they live, by pop culture, by politics and by the whole of the world given how technology has made it so accessible.

Making your brands accessible, relevant and relatable to a broader set of consumers can produce feelings of uncertainty, anxiety and even fear. You might become concerned about stepping out of your capabilities and competency comfort zone. Then there’s the fear of getting it wrong and the impact on career success, including compensation and promotions.

In some cases, your first line of defense might be to resist or to minimize the importance of the work required to manage a broader set of consumers or to delegate it. But doing so can be detrimental to your brand’s success. You may believe you or your team don’t have the know-how, the budget or the time — but these would just be reasons not to act in your brand’s best interest. Multicultural consumers are just American consumers with different mindsets, viewpoints and tastes, and you need them. You must find a way to take the steps to understand them culturally and behaviorally and integrate them into your brand’s implementation.

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To do so, consider the advice of emotional intelligence experts Kandi Wiens and Darin Rowell in their Harvard Business Review article “How to Embrace Change Using Emotional Intelligence.” They suggest managers must travel through four stages:

  1. Identify the source of the resistance.
  2. Identify the emotional basis for it (the frame of reference).
  3. Own that your reaction may stem from your own conditioning and frame of reference.
  4. Choose to move forward by looking for the business upsides and opportunities in the required change or changes.

Optimizing your mindset, outlook, capabilities and cultural competency as a marketer must become your first line of defense. This alone is key to increasing appreciation of the value various cultural consumer segments can contribute to your top line. Without this foundation, efforts to optimize the customer journey will fall short and effective personalization will prove ever more challenging.

The great news is you already know how to do this. To start, take an objective approach to the analysis by following this process:

  1. Start by reviewing your company or brand’s goals, strategies and implementation plan. The idea is to focus on the big picture of the business and where it needs to go.
  2. Open your mind and accept that meeting established goals and implementing set strategies requires a constant search for new revenue streams that align with the business.
  3. Think of the demographic, ethnic and cultural characteristics that define your best customers and get curious about significant ways the country’s demographics have shifted and continue to shift. How is the size of your “core customers” impacted? Are they growing or are they shrinking?
  4. Run the numbers to determine the impact of this growth or decline on your brand’s health now and in the future. Will changing demographics impact your company or brand’s ability to achieve growth goals?
  5. Determine which segment(s) of growing populations consume your product category in a similar way or quantity as your current core consumers and quantify how their aggregate consumption can contribute to your top-line and market share growth.

Working through these steps will help you understand the logic of casting a wider, yet targeted, net. You’ll be surprised at how much more familiar consumers of other cultures appear once you reduce their characteristics to their revenue potential. This exercise will help you define the worth of new cultural segments to the business and what you can gain or lose by tapping or ignoring them.

Accelerating revenue growth requires tapping as many sources of revenue as possible. As such, it’s imperative to broaden and rethink the definition of your core consumer and take steps to understand this more diverse set of consumers demographically, socially, culturally and behaviorally.


I was fortunate enough to have started Tai Chi a moving meditation at a very early age. Practicing Tai Chi for over 25 years has allowed me to build a solid foundation to support the most important aspect of EQ development, which is attention training.

If you are interested in supporting yourself or helping the teams you manage, the links below can help you learn more about EQ training.

  1. What is EQ?
  2. Emotional Intelligence Training Course
  3. Learn to meditate with the Just6 App4. Improve Self Awareness with the Fettle-App
  4. Meditation and the Science
  5. 7 reasons that emotional intelligence is quickly becoming one of the top sought job skills
  6. The secret to a high salary Emotional intelligence
  7. How to bring mindfulness into your employee wellness program
  8. Google ’Search Inside Yourself’

New study shows that training adults in a loving-kindness-style “compassion meditation” actually makes them significantly more altruistic toward others.

How to train the compassionate brain was an article from Mindful.org. A new study finds that training in compassion makes us more altruistic.

The first time I ever tried a loving-kindness meditation, I was overcome by a feeling of complete… futility. Mentally extending compassion to others and wishing them free from suffering seemed nice enough, but I had a hard time believing that my idle thoughts could increase kindness in the real world.

Turns out I was wrong.

A new study, just published online by Psychological Science, shows that training adults in a loving-kindness-style “compassion meditation” actually makes them significantly more altruistic toward others.

The study suggests not only that it’s possible to increase compassion and altruism in the world, but that we can do so even through relatively brief training.

What’s more, the study is the first to link these behavioral changes with measurable changes in brain activity, shedding light on why compassionate thoughts may actually lead to compassionate deeds. “We really wanted to show that compassion is a skill that you can work on, like exercise or learning a musical instrument,” says the study’s lead author, Helen Weng, who is a graduate student at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, where she’s affiliated with the Center for Investigating Healthy Minds.

Training to help

In the study, Weng and her colleagues gave participants one of two trainings. In both trainings, the participants listened to a 30-minute audio recording on their own once a day for just two weeks.

One was the compassion meditation. The compassion meditation gently instructed the participants to extend feelings of compassion toward different people, including themselves, a loved one, a casual acquaintance, and someone with whom they’d had difficulty.

The researchers call the other audio recording a “reappraisal training” because it involved recalling a stressful experience and trying to think about it in a new, less upsetting way, such as by considering it from another person’s point of view.

Before and immediately after each two-week training, all participants had their brains scanned in an fMRI machine while they looked at a series of images, some of which depicted people in pain, such as a burn victim or a crying child.

Also immediately after the trainings, the participants played an online game designed to measure their altruistic behavior. In the game, they were given $5, another player was given $10, and a third player had no money. (The other “players” were actually computer generated, but the participants were led to believe they were real people.) Each study participant first watched as the player with $10 was asked to share some of his money but gave only $1 to the penniless player, who the researchers refer to as the “victim.” The participant could then choose to spend any amount of his $5; whatever he spent would have to be doubled by the wealthy player and given to the victim. So if the participant was willing to part with $2, the victim would receive $4 from the other player.

Would people who received the compassion training be more willing to spend their money in order to help a stranger in need?

They were—in fact, they spent nearly twice as much as people who received the reappraisal training, $1.14 vs. $0.62.

Changing the Brain

It’s important to note that, during the game, participants weren’t instructed to think about anything they’d learned during their training. Yet that brief daily meditation still seemed to have a strong carry-over effect on their behavior.

“This demonstrates that purely mental training in compassion can result in observable altruistic changes toward a victim,” the researchers write in their paper, “even when individuals are not explicitly cued to generate compassion.”

And these changes were also reflected in changes to brain activity. Specifically, when compared with their brain activity before the training, people who received the compassion training showed increased activity in neural networks involved in understanding the suffering of others, regulating emotions, and positive feelings in response to a reward or goal.

The researchers saw similar brain changes in the reappraisal training group, but that brain activity didn’t translate into altruistic behavior. To explain this, the researchers propose how the interaction between the training, brain activity, and behavior may have differed between the two groups.

They point out that a heightened sensitivity to suffering causes people to avoid that suffering because it doesn’t feel good; however, because the compassion training also seemed to strengthen the brain’s ability to regulate emotions, people may have been able to sense suffering without feeling overwhelmed by it. Instead, the care for others emphasized by the compassion training may have caused them to see suffering not as a threat to their own well-being but as an opportunity to reap the psychic rewards from achieving an important goal—namely, connecting with someone else and making him feel better.

“When your goal is to help another person, then your reward system will be activated when you’re meeting that goal,” says Weng. By contrast, the reappraisal group’s goal was to decrease their own negative emotions, making them less inclined to be altruistic when confronted with someone else’s pain. “When you’re focused on decreasing your own negative emotions,” she says, “I think that makes you less focused on other people.”

Building on previous studies

This study follows prior research documenting the positive effects of other compassion training programs, such as the Compassion Cultivation Training developed at Stanford Univeristy and the Cognitively-Based Compassion Training out of Emory University. A study published earlier this year, also in Psychological Science, suggests that training in mindfulness meditation significantly increases compassionate behavior.

But this new study is noteworthy for several reasons. For one thing, many of the previous studies have examined trainings that took several hours a week for at least eight weeks; this study’s compassion training, by contrast, took just a total of seven hours over two weeks.

Also, prior studies of compassion trainings have mostly looked at their effects on brain activity, emotional well-being, or physical health. But this is the first study to both examine “whether training in compassion will make you more caring and helpful toward others,” says Weng, and then document how “those changes in behavior are linked to changes in neural and emotional responding to people suffering.”

Weng says she’s excited by the implication that people can develop significantly more compassion and altruism, even outside of a training like the one she helped to create.

“Our findings support the possibility that compassion and altruism can be viewed as trainable skills rather than as stable traits,” she and her co-authors write. “This lays the groundwork for future research to explore whether compassion-related trainings can benefit fields that depend on altruism and cooperation (e.g., medicine) as well as clinical subgroups characterized by deficits in compassion, such as psychopaths.”


I was fortunate enough to have started Tai Chi a moving meditation at a very early age. Practising Tai Chi for over 25 years has allowed me to build a solid foundation to support the most important aspect of EQ development, which is attention training.

If you are interested in supporting yourself or helping the teams you manage, the links below can help you learn more about EQ training.

  1. What is EQ?
  2. Emotional Intelligence Training Course
  3. Learn to meditate with the Just6 App
  4. Meditation and the Science
  5. 7 reasons that emotional intelligence is quickly becoming one of the top sought job skills
  6. The secret to a high salary Emotional intelligence
  7. How to bring mindfulness into your employee wellness program
  8. Google ’Search Inside Yourself’

Women are uniquely equipped with the soft skills required to succeed in negotiation. Emotional Intelligence Gives Women an Upper Hand as Negotiators. Learn EQ training.

Wanted to share this great post

It’s one of the oldest business adages in the book: You don’t get what you deserve, you get what you negotiate. Successful negotiation, particularly in high-stakes situations, is often the difference between a smashing success and a crushing failure.

Related: How to Deal With Jerks at Work Without Becoming One

In the past, negotiation has been conceived of as a battle of wills, a deadlock between two aggressive parties where the first one to blink loses. However, in my experience, successful negotiation is much more nuanced – and much less testosterone-fueled.

Winning is good, but finding solutions that are satisfactory to both parties is best.

Women, with their innate emotional intelligence, are uniquely equipped with the soft skills required to succeed in negotiation. Here’s why:

1. Successful negotiation requires building relationships.

The key to any successful negotiation is establishing relationships of trust. Without these mutual understandings, the parties will focus on serving their own selfish needs and compromise will be difficult.

It’s rare for any two parties to enter negotiation ready to fully yield to the other’s requests. The power of a healthy relationship can step into this gap and help build bridges between two otherwise estranged groups.

“Women tend to be better at emotional empathy than men, in general,“ Dr. Dan Goleman wrote in Psychology Today. “This kind of empathy fosters rapport and chemistry. People who excel in emotional empathy make good counselors, teachers and group leaders because of this ability to sense in the moment how others are reacting.”

Ranking high in emotional intelligence gives women an edge when it comes to building relationships. Empathy – understanding where people are coming from and what they need, is perhaps the single most important part of building a strong relationship – and successfully negotiating with someone.

Related: Women, It’s Time to Take Control

2. Being able to articulately describe feelings is key.

The ability to express one’s feelings is another crucial element of negotiation. Two stiff-lipped negotiators can stare each other down for hours without success, waiting for the other to crack.

As women, society gives us the necessary permission to use the language we need to communicate our emotions. As LaRae Quy, an FBI counterintelligence agent, has noted, “Little girls are given permission by society to be empathetic, use language that expresses emotions, and place priorities on developing deep and meaningful relationships (starting with dolls).”

Unfortunately, men do not receive the same opportunity. Men’s stoicism can be an Achilles heel in negotiation, as successfully identifying and matching emotional currents in the room can mean the difference between success and failure.

“The effective negotiator or mediator must take into account not only the economic, political and physical aspects of the process, but also the emotional tenor of themselves as well as that of all of the parties,“ Edward Kelly and Natalija Kaminskienė wrote in their landmark study on the importance of emotional intelligence in negotiation and mediation.

Women’s ability to recognize and speak about their feelings and those of others make them naturally suited for negotiation.

3. In negotiation, influence means more than authority.

Men often approach negotiation from a position of authority. While there’s nothing inherently wrong with that, I believe it is not the best or most effective tactic to use when trying to build consensus.

Everyone has some level of resistance to authority.

Related: Powerful Women Don’t Need the Limelight to Be Influential. Here’s Why.

With power always comes the threat of abuse. Influence, on the other hand, is a more subtle thing. It’s generated by empathizing with the person you are negotiating with and steering their opinions in your direction. It’s what really sparks the combustion in the engines of negotiation.

Women’s empathy and relationship-building ability allows them to quickly build influence with others. They can read a room and gauge what the peripheral audience thinks of the situation.

All of this data collection gives them sway in the negotiation. Their influence over the situation increases the odds that the final compromise will swing in their favor.

4. Sensitivity to feedback is crucial when working out a compromise.

A 2016 study detailed in the Harvard Business Review compared dozens of male and female students at a Spanish business college, and found that the women were significantly more sensitive to peer feedback than their male counterparts.

While one’s self-esteem should never be reliant on the opinions of others, sensitivity to feedback can be a tremendous advantage in some situations – like high stakes negotiation. If you’re not listening to the other party and taking their positions seriously, you’re not engaged in a negotiation – it’s an argument.

Every negotiation is different, and of course, men have innate skills that are very valuable as well, but women are rightfully beginning to take their place at the table as expert negotiators, and it’s not hard to see why.


I was fortunate enough to have started Tai Chi a moving meditation at a very early age. Practising Tai Chi for over 25 years has allowed me to build a solid foundation to support the most important aspect of EQ development, which is attention training.

If you are interested in supporting yourself or helping the teams you manage, the links below can help you learn more about EQ training.

  1. What is EQ?
  2. Emotional Intelligence Training Course
  3. Learn to meditate with the Just6 App
  4. Meditation and the Science
  5. 7 reasons that emotional intelligence is quickly becoming one of the top sought job skills
  6. The secret to a high salary Emotional intelligence
  7. How to bring mindfulness into your employee wellness program
  8. Google ’Search Inside Yourself’

While IQ remains a very strong predictor of career success, research suggests that secret to a high salary is emotional intelligence. Learn to boost your EQ.

found this article here. Thought I would share. Enjoy 🙂

People with better social skills tend to out-earn their colleagues, but what can you do to build your emotional IQ?

While IQ remains a very strong predictor of career success, our research suggests that people with high emotional intelligence are more likely to have higher wages.

The study, published in the Journal of Vocational Behaviour in August 2017, tested US university students for emotional intelligence, or EI, during their studies – and then looked at their career trajectory over the course of 10 years. The results showed us that students who scored highly for EI went on to have better salaries across all industries than their less emotionally intelligent peers.

So why do people with emotional intelligence earn more? EI means being able to understand others’ emotions – at work, this skill allows you to accurately motivate and influence other peoples’ behaviours.

The study showed that people with high EI tend to use their skills to become deeply embedded in the company’s social network – essentially, they make many friends. This gives them access to more information and knowledgeable colleagues, which in turn improves their performance and leads to a higher wage.

Emotional intelligence is also an attractive quality for mentors. Who wouldn’t want to help someone who was self-aware, emotionally balanced and perceptive to other peoples’ needs and emotions? The research found that people with high EI are more likely to have senior mentors, which again has a positive influence on their career success.

Likewise, people with high EI are more open to accepting feedback and learning from their mistakes. By contrast, people with low levels of emotional intelligence are less willing to accept criticism and self-improve: this is likely to hold them back in their careers.

People with high EI also have the ability to perceive, understand and manage their own emotions – which helps enormously in dealing with complex interpersonal situations at work.

While EI is important at all stages of a career, it becomes more important as you climb the professional ladder. More senior roles require individuals to be successful by inspiring, persuading and building rapport with others. So based on the findings of the study, one would imagine EI to have a greater impact on salary the higher up an organisation you climb.

We don’t enter the job market with just our heads: working with others is entirely social. We need to engage our mind and body in these interactions to succeed at work.

So what can you do to build emotional intelligence?

First, you need to develop emotional awareness. Make a conscious effort to be mindful of your own thoughts and emotional reactions to situations. Think about how you will be perceived by others. Make a diary of daily events and reflect on how you behaved each day, what the feedback was and how you can improve your empathy.

Second, make an effort to take part in team activities or roles at work that involve social interaction. This will open you up to opportunities for empathy. If you find social interactions difficult, it will also help you learn how to deal with stressful situations and anxiety.

And lastly, seek out coaching and development opportunities from mentors, teachers and colleagues. This will help you to better integrate into the company’s social network, develop your social skills and set the right mindset for behavioural change. Start asking colleagues for regular feedback and act on it.


I was fortunate enough to have started Tai Chi a moving meditation at a very early age. Practising Tai Chi for over 25 years has allowed me to build a solid foundation to support the most important aspect of EQ development, which is attention training.

If you are interested in supporting yourself or helping the teams you manage, the links below can help you learn more about EQ training.

  1. What is EQ?
  2. Emotional Intelligence Training Course
  3. Learn to meditate with the Just6 App
  4. Meditation and the Science
  5. 7 reasons that emotional intelligence is quickly becoming one of the top sought job skills
  6. The secret to a high salary Emotional intelligence
  7. How to bring mindfulness into your employee wellness program
  8. Google ’Search Inside Yourself’